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Author Topic: Our 21 Point Program  (Read 898 times)

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Patron

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Our 21 Point Program
« on: April 01, 2018, 07:21:03 PM »

Here you will find a link to the CNP 21 Point Program.

The program is for the voting public and serves as an initial selling point for the party. It is not a document to be used internally by its members or leadership team, only to give the potential voter an "at a glance" feel for what our party stands for.

It is for this reason that we make the program digestible and simple for the mainstream voter.

The program is becoming more effective than ever to attract new members to our party.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2018, 02:12:38 PM by Patron »
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Franklin

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2018, 11:00:58 AM »

Here you will find a link to the CNP 21 Point Program.

On the last point, you could firm it up to say something like:

21. In order to carry out this program, abolish the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and re-establish Parliament as the supreme law-making authority in Canada, relegating the Supreme Court to interprerting Acts of Parliament based on their content, as was the case historically.

The Charter is, of course, a straight jacket imposed on English Canada by Pierre Trudeau in order to attack majority decisions. He called them the "tyranny of the majority," a quote which shows where he was coming from. Most, if not all, the other points in our program would immediately be attacked as infringing on Charter rights; so it's best to get rid of this weapon from the get go.
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Maurice

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2018, 05:12:15 PM »

I don't think that the Parliament and Supreme Court would necessarily operate in our favor despite the abolishing of the Charter. It would be better to revise it in our favor.

The idea of the tyranny of the majority has been a longstanding concept in the history of the West when criticizing the tendency for democracy to be completely overturned by the popular will. On the other hand, this is a useful concept for overturning democracy itself in favor of whoever employs it. It was often used by the Founding Fathers and was even implicitly referenced by MacDonald in his monarchical principle. Trudeau was smart to use this for victimized minorities just as we could use it to protect a privileged class of elite whites. Let's not forget, the majority were the ones to elect both Pierre and Justin into power in the first place, resulting in the very charter you claim is so anti-majoritarian.

Furthermore, I think we have to accept that open electoral systems inevitably close by nature. They are first limited by their constitutions which outline the voting process, they are limited by whether they choose to be pluralist or proportional democracies. They are then limited by the decision as to whether or not there will be regional and popular representation. Finally, once elections take place, open electoral systems are limited by multi-party states consolidating into two party states under Duverger's law. Often times, the major parties will have something to do with the founding of the nation before it formally became a Democracy. And once a major party is in power (especially with a majority), they can completely reform the system in their favor.

We need to make sure power consolidates in our favor. The goal shouldn't be to open it up to whoever, but to make sure we close it off for ourselves. We ought to consider reforming the constitution, imposing our own bills and charters, increasing the role of the senate and head of state, appointing a head of state of our own, limiting if not abolishing the house of commons, restricting voting rights based on certain qualifications, restricting voting rights to party members, etc.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2018, 10:50:36 PM by mporter »
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Neart

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2018, 08:21:07 PM »

Question for point 2.
Quote
Reclaim our money supply by legally reforming the Bank of Canada to allow the Government of Canada interest-free loans.

With the bank of Canada, would you nationalized it so to take it out of private hands and start having the government make be money?

Sorry I have recently been studying economics and the history of money. So want to see whatbCNP stand on fixing the bank/money issue. And please say you are not planning on going with the gold standard.
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Patron

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2018, 08:37:43 PM »

Nationalizing the Bank of Canada is precisely what must be done. We need to take it out of private hands and put it in the hands of the Canadian Government.

That's the way it used to be. Guess who sold us out?
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Neart

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2018, 07:53:31 AM »

If the current model,was based of the old bankmof England then it has always been in private hands. But good to hear that you have that plan. :)
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Smith

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2018, 08:59:47 AM »



Sorry I have recently been studying economics and the history of money. So want to see whatbCNP stand on fixing the bank/money issue. And please say you are not planning on going with the gold standard.

What's wrong with the gold standard?
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Neart

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2018, 02:53:28 PM »

From one book I have read "The lost science of money" by Stephen Zarlen ga

"Gold standard is been little more then a ruse and way to concentrate special monetary pirvileges in to the hands of a plutocracy"so means money power is in the hands of the private bankers.

It just 1 Thing. To me the book explains money though history. Things like the gold/silver ratio and how that was abused. As well some say gold standard stops inflation, but it has been shown that it does not always as we have seen doubling of prices a few times.

I via read a few other books and the gold standard is just not a good system to build off of.  Just my thoughts, some of the strong money systems were not built off gold standard , such as the Greenbacks for the 1800's in the US and I believe 1930's in germany for how they recovered was not off the gold standard. It was basd off a system by Gottfried Feder. Was off labour and agriculture. 

Each is to their own but a government working off the gold stand in  my mind is doom to fail and just become a puppet for the private bankers.
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Maurice

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2018, 03:08:10 PM »

I can address this one, as this particular policy was actually one of my suggestions. Canada's bank is technically a National Bank but it operates more like a Central Bank.

This is a distinction that the economist Henry C. K. Liu has commented on in particular in his series on central banking (http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Global_Economy/DK06Dj01.html) claiming:
"A national bank does not seek independence from the government. The independence of central banks is a euphemism for a shift from institutional loyalty to national economic well-being toward institutional loyalty to the smooth functioning of a global financial architecture. The international finance architecture at this moment in history is dominated by US dollar hegemony, which can be simply defined by the dollar's unjustified status as a global reserve currency. The operation of the current international finance architecture requires the sacrifice of local economies in a financial food chain that feeds the issuer of US dollars. It is the monetary aspect of the predatory effects of globalization.

Historically, the term "central bank" has been interchangeable with the term "national bank". In fact, the enabling act to establish the first national bank, the Bank of the United States, referred to the bank interchangeably as a central and a national bank. However, with the globalization of financial markets in recent decades, a central bank has become fundamentally different from a national bank."

This is actually something that the Bank of Canada has been taken to court over by the Committee on Monetary and Economic Reform, as their actions are regarded as having contradicted the purpose of nationalizing the bank. To quote COMER's website:
 
"The Bank of Canada was nationalized in 1938 and is wholly owned by the Canadian people. Between 1938 and 1974, the federal government borrowed at low or no interest from the bank. But in 1974, Canada embraced monetarism, which helped usher in the neoliberal policies of North American countries in the 1980s and 1990s. The Canadian government began to borrow from private foreign banks rather than financing its own public programs. Massive public debt was the result. "

To quote Dr. Kerry Bolton's "Breaking the Bondage of Interest":
"Canada was another British Dominion that had recourse to state credit, and for a much longer period than most others. Canada maintained this state credit system into the 1970s. The state owned Bank of Canada issued up to half of all new money at low interest, which in turn forced the commercial banks to keep interest rates low. This resulted in decades of prosperity. Now the Bank of Canada creates just 2% of the credit. From 1935–1939 the Bank of Canada was issuing most of the nation’s credit, and 62% of the credit during the last years of the War. Until the mid 1970s the Canadian Government continued to create enough new state money to monetarize 20% to 30% of the state deficit.

That ratio is now only 7.5%. While the money supply increases by $22 billion annually, the Bank of Canada now issues less than 2% of that money. It has been estimated that if the Canadian Government had continued to operate such a financial system as she had for around three decades, that nation would today be operating with a surplus of $13 billion"

The goal of this policy is to ultimately review the legitimacy of a lot of the debt our public institutions have incurred at the hands of private lending. This ultimately gives the government greater control over the monetary supply and prevents the growth of a currency based in debt while better enabling a currency based in a high purchasing power. This is a strategy that was not only employed by Germany and Italy in the 30's (allowing them to thrive while other nations were unable to prosper) but it was also employed in China by Deng Xiaoping in the in 80's.

"Under Deng Xiaoping, China changed from a centrally-planned economy to its own market-based model under government-owned banks able to issue credit for domestic development. Until the global economic crisis emerged, it grew impressively at double-digit rates.

Key is its banking system, its government-issued currency, and a system of state-owned banks. Henry CK Liu distinguishes between “national” and “central” banks – the former serves the national and public interest; the latter, private international finance at the expense of the nation and people.

In 1995, China’s Central Bank Law gave the People’s Bank of China (PBoC) central bank status, but more in name than form in that it still follows government policies by directing money for internal development, not bank profits. In addition, China is debt free and thus unemcumbered by IMF mandates and predatory banking cartel interests. It also protected its currency by refusing to let it float (beyond a minor adjustment) and be vulnerable to speculative predators.

The proof is in the results. China’s independent monetary policy works, much like colonial America, government under Lincoln, and Nazi Germany under Hitler. They printed their own money, debt free, and prospered – impossible under today’s American model of indebtedness to predatory bankers."
– (http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-rise-and-fall-of-the-international-gold-standard/13559?print=1)

It is worth noting that at this point in time, China has a higher GDP in terms of purchasing power than the U.S.
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Maurice

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #9 on: April 10, 2018, 03:21:44 PM »

What's wrong with the gold standard?

The gold standard works when a government holds most of it's gold in reserves. If not, then there is a tendency for private individuals to horde as if they are their own feudal lords. Historically, the holding of gold in reserves was the case with many nations under the "gold standard" and there were still paper notes in circulation. The issue with gold, in my opinion, is that:
1) a nations development is limited by the amount of gold held in reserve
2) a nation's development will be unfairly disadvantaged by countries with more gold
3) historically, the gold standard has still been subject to inflation when large quantities of it are introduced into the national economy

Accepting that currency is backed by force, accepting that the state is a monopoly of force over a given territory, and accepting that territory comes with resources and value, I am led to believed that fiat money distributed by a national bank (over a Central Bank) operating under the State Theory of Money (over Quantity Theory of Money) is most superior. Whether that fiat currency is distributed in the form of paper notes or digitally is irrelevant, though the latter would seem more convenient.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2018, 08:02:54 PM by mporter »
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Neart

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #10 on: April 10, 2018, 06:38:41 PM »

As well Canada has no gold reserves. The last gold It Was sold off by the liberal government at the start of 2017. So to go to a gold standard would be  a issue when you have none.

But mporter hit all the nails on the head in his 2 above posts .
« Last Edit: April 14, 2018, 05:22:49 PM by Neart »
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Neart

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2018, 05:26:28 PM »

Another question:

What is CNP foreign policy?

Sorry with the questions, but I want to find a good solid party. So far it seems a good fit as well as others that share my views  :)
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Faust

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2018, 10:09:51 PM »

Hello, I have a few issues with the 21 Points Program as shown by the CNP. If you think this response should be its own thread just let me know and I'll move it. I just thought I'd keep it here for neatness.

The overarching idea behind a lot of these ideas are solid, and I support roughly 80% of them in practice. I take issue with 1, 5, 15, on mainly pragmatic grounds for what it is worth. However as a method of marketing the party they are far less than ideal. If your intent is to attract politicos and pseudo-intellectuals (like myself) then congratulations are in order. However in order to reach out to an actual voting base in a smooth, and neatly formulated way, I think 21 points is far too many.

There are some options here, you can retain the 21 points, but maybe pick two or three that you'd like to be the equivalent of party slogans, my suggestions for these would be:
#2, which I would sell as student loan reform, guaranteeing cheap (or free) student loans to historically Canadian families - you could also combine this with #3, by saying you'd pay for this utilizing the savings from less immigration overhead.
#7, which I would sell as Trump did in the States, as the TPP exists only as a deal to enrich other countries (and our own ruling class) and to undermine national sovereignty. This can be combined with #8.
In doing this we've essentially created a firmly economic-nationalist program to run with in the near future. This is important because not only is economic-nationalism one of the few actually acceptable forms of neonationalism, but it also puts you in stark opposition to both the Conservative party as it stands, and the Liberal party as it stands. Also economic-nationalism has been shown to easily cause a base to rise up in support of you even in the face of greater funded opposition, as the election of Trump has shown in the US.

You could also retain the 21 points and instead of gleaning party slogans/main ideas from them you formulate your own based of soundbites that are essentially free wins. Free Speech, Canadians First, No War, etc. For an underpinning philosophy of this party the 21 points are sorely lacking in any of these issues which Canadians feel strongly about - it is as if they have been overlooked as 'givens'. My sincerest advice is to not allow this to happen, you will be ripped apart for it in no short order. If you do not show a commitment to free speech front and center, your party will be outed as proto-fascistic and routed by the media.

I may be making a big assumption here but I am assuming you will be diverging from these 21 points as you seek election in a national campaign? If not then I'd seriously consider just taking them down from your website and never referring to them ever again if you plan to win nationally. In terms of winning in two or three provinces I think they're pretty solid over all.

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Anonymous

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2018, 11:41:00 AM »

... we could use it to protect a privileged class of elite whites.

Ouch!
Perhaps changing that to "elite Canadians" would be more helpful.  And defining "elite Canadians" along the lines of Plato's Guardians or some other appropriate measure.

This brings up the (white) elephant in the room.  I would argue for a "Canada for Canadians" policy where Canadians are people with a CA passport.
We should be colourblind, like MLK wanting to be judged not on the colour of his skin but on his moral character etc.  In fact, I would argue that MLK quote should be somewhere visible on the CNP website.
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Neart

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Re: Our 21 Point Program
« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2018, 06:10:45 PM »

MLK (not be to a dick) is not what I would chose as a example of a moral character. He like the women of the night,his name was change to Martin luther by his father after his father changed his own name. But he never changed it legally so by law that was not his real name.

https://redice.tv/news/the-truth-about-martin-luther-king-jr

Understand the message, but I would be careful using quote from him as he was know for taking others work and calling it his own.

Yes he did try to change the things peacefully, but a Canadian party should most likely try to find a example from Canada. Kinda kills the idea of beening nationalist but using a non Canadian as a source of party quotes. Just my thoughts on the matter
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